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Thread: Should a resume have footnotes?

  1. #1
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    Should a resume have footnotes?

    If I list skills/capacities, should I use footnotes to connect a specific attribute to evidence.

    For example, if I wrote "Proficient in Java 1"

    and had a footnote saying "5 on AP Computer Science Exam"

    would that be appropriate?
    Listen to others, even the dull and ignorant. They too have their story.

    -Max Ehrmann

    Alex6200@gmail.com

  2. #2
    prstudio's Avatar
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    Formerly known as hybrd_dvlpr. This makes life simpler.
    While thematically correct, my advice would be no.

    Employers want to review your resume as quickly as possible.

    Most information in the least amount of time. This means from a data presentation perspective it should require the least amount of "interconnectivity" possible.

    In the above example, while you may have scored a 5 on an AP Computer Exam that does not mean you are proficient in Java 1 - it just means that you scored a 5 on the AP Computer Exam. These would be two separate skills/achievements/accomplishments.

  3. #3
    No, if your prospective employer is interested in your Java programming capabilities, you'll be asked to prove it in an interview. The same goes with most specifics that you think you should include on your resume. Someone will say "But I got an 84.56 average in grade 11!" They don't care. You'll have the opportunity to prove you're intelligent in an interview, they don't care how you did in Pre-Calculus with Mr. Smith.

  4. #4
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    But if I don't know how would they know that I'm not exaggerating my skills.

    And besides, AP Computer Science exam is meant to measure proficiency in Java (methinks).
    Listen to others, even the dull and ignorant. They too have their story.

    -Max Ehrmann

    Alex6200@gmail.com

  5. #5
    Unless your resume is for applying to a college I'd leave out your AP scores.

  6. #6
    prstudio's Avatar
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    Formerly known as hybrd_dvlpr. This makes life simpler.
    Don't worry they will ask you. If they're any good at "employing" they will at least. If they don't then you got away with it. Sink or swim time.

    Proficiency in Java is measured by what you can actually create, not knowing terms, flow, and structure. When you get a job it will come down to what you can actually do. Plenty of people can pass a server-side class, but not many of those can actually code worth a flip.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Al6200 View Post
    But if I don't know how would they know that I'm not exaggerating my skills.

    And besides, AP Computer Science exam is meant to measure proficiency in Java (methinks).
    If it is meant to measure proficiency, they don't know that. Believe me. They'll have an HR person scan (not read) your resume to see if you match the qualifications (putting your AP exam mark doesn't count), and if you get passed this point they'll have you for an interview. They'll probably have a tech guy in there and a business guy at the interview. Neither will care what you got on your AP exam.

    You could tell them you're the ruler of earth and created Java back when you were an infant. Obviously they'd give you the interview, but they're going to test you there for your knowledge. Saying you're proficient in Java is good to get you the interview, they don't need proof in the resume stage, they need proof in the interview stage That's why it exists, otherwise they'd just hire you after reading your resume. As if!

    Tell them you got a 5 on your AP exam in the interview and go over what that means. A number on a sheet of paper doesn't mean anything in the real world to them. You'd be extremely lucky if someone reading your resume will be young enough to remember high school, let alone having done an AP course and remember something having to do with the grading scheme. The interview is the perfect time to mention and explain this because you'll be able to explain what it means. What are you going to write on your resume?

    Code:
    ......
    Proficient in the Java programming language *
    .....
    .....
    .....
    
    
    
    * Achieved 5 on the final exam. Which is the top score, and can only be attained by getting near perfect. This means I know object-oriented programming, syntax and general usage extremely well.
    Because that's the only way it's going to mean anything to anyone sitting on your resume. And this will make you seem like you're trying to bloat your skills, rather than point out your qualifications.

    That's just my take on it anyway. Not trying to be negative on you, 5's an awesome score and you should definitely be proud of it, it's just a resume is not the place for it. It'll get you ridiculed before hired, and that's not a good thing

  8. #8
    Don't put that on your resume. Just list your skills, and if they want proof they'll give you a method to prove it. Once you get an interview I would really try to talk about real world challenges you've faced, or ways you've used Java, instead of about your classes on it.

  9. #9
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    Well, there are two jobs.

    One is for a web developer, $15 an hour, and the other I'm thinking about applying for is Gamespot retail.
    Listen to others, even the dull and ignorant. They too have their story.

    -Max Ehrmann

    Alex6200@gmail.com

  10. #10
    Yep... best to leave room for all your other skills and details.

    *Story
    So last time the place I work for hired someone we only got one resume... pretty underqualified individual (still got the job)... his resume lacked skill points and read: HTML, PHP, and Photoshop, ect... no where did it say versions or specific softwares.
    *End Story

    So the way you said "Java 1" do that with all your skills. Very good thing. ect...

    Also funny part don't feel bad about saying Dreamweaver... a lot of sites are built with their templates and companies have to maintain them.


    //edit, Cool Gamespot... do it (as long as they don't pay less than say 10). But really retail is a lot less stressful and more motivating. You know what I mean you don't feel like a button pusher all day (one thing I miss about working at a grocery store).
    Last edited by Templarian; February 21st, 2008 at 07:39 PM.

    Join #kirupa | Click the under my Username | CL | Jeff

  11. #11
    I promise that Gamespot doesn't care about your Java or your AP exams.

  12. #12
    Footnotes wouldn't be appreciated. However, part of any resume also includes your educational credentials so it would be appropriate to include the reference to it there, e.g.
    AP Computer Exam....score achieved: 5/5

    As mentioned above, you can elaborate on what that score actually means in practical terms during the interview stage.
    2006-11 GlosRFC - Searching 8,168,684,336 brain cells

  13. #13
    Another reason I hate including scores for tests, etc. is that if you include it for one but leave it off for a bevy of others, it's possible to assume you're not as good at the other things than you are at the one. So let's say you did 3 AP courses, all relevant to your current job search (I don't know if these all exist, etc):

    AP Java Programming - 5/5 score
    AP Computer Science - 4/5 score
    AP Calculus - 2/5 score
    AP English - 1/5 score

    Now let's say you only include your Java score, this will imply you didn't do as well in the other courses, which is true, but this is not the face you're trying to put forward. If you include all of the scores, you're explicitly stating that you've done poorly, especially in Math and English, and is thus a reason to not even give you an interview if they feel your math/english skills are really necessary. This level might be on shaky ground ethically... but as far as I'm concerned, if you leave the marks off for every course, no harm no foul.

    As far as your current job opportunities go, I can tell you for a fact that the only reason that the Gamespot retail job would care anything at all for your exam score would be because they're absolute idiots and dolts and have no idea about qualifications. As for the web development job, past experience and examples given through portfolio/interview will be higher value than any score on a Java exam.
    Last edited by McGuffin; February 21st, 2008 at 07:50 PM.

  14. #14
    I personally wouldn't put them on there at all... but if you only have one score on your sheet and the job isn't specifically java programming then I would leave it off.

    Really a series of questions related to the job in the interview can prove pretty fast if you know what your talking about. I mean during my interview (PHP dev) it was just basic php questions walla your resume wasn't a lie your hired.

    But, yea this was also a good time for number such as "PHP 4 or 5 Application Development"

    Join #kirupa | Click the under my Username | CL | Jeff

  15. #15
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    Registered User
    Well... For Gamespot on the app it asks for "Computer Skills", "PC software knowledge", and "Office Machine skills"

    I assume they're only looking for basic computer skills, but I always figure that having a unique degree of skills might make me more of a versatile employee. Sure, my job would be retail, but having web programming skills might be useful if the company feels like doing some extra stuff on the side, has computer trouble, etc.

    I'd plan on bringing an AP score sheet with me so they could see all the results (I'd of course only take that to the interview, just to verify things).

    If it's a print resume, how should I send them my portfolio (I just have a couple of sites, both in ASP.NET, made for my class).

    Is a transcript or an SAT score report a good thing to bring to the interview?
    Listen to others, even the dull and ignorant. They too have their story.

    -Max Ehrmann

    Alex6200@gmail.com

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